PAINT UPDATE: Susie and Justice Thriving after Rescue

Categories: Animal Cruelty,Horse Rescue

Susie and Justice, two paint horses rescued on Sunday, July 7, 2013 from horrific conditions in Miami Gardens, Florida, are thriving and on the path to restored health under the care of the South Florida SPCA. Below you’ll see the amazing transformation Susie and Justice have undergone in the first three weeks after being rescued. They become stronger, more confident and trusting every day. They no longer look emaciated and their wounds are healing. They enjoy baths and treats and the soft touch of their rescuers’ hands now…a world away from where they were a little over a month ago.

Susie_BandA_1

Justice_BandA_1
Photos: Susie (top) and Justice (below).

The starving and wounded mare and gelding were found inside a deplorable nailed-shut stall without food or water, and had resorted to eating wood, sand and their own feces in desperation. Once rescued, they were immediately taken to the SFSPCA’s ranch in Homestead where they received around-the-clock care. While Justice improved quickly, it was touch-and-go with Susie as she battled colic and gastric ulcers.

News of the paints’ plight spread all over the world, and donations poured in to the SFSPCA’s “Paint Bucket” emergency fund to help pay for the intensive care the two horses needed in order to survive. They are alive and well because so many cared and gave generously.

Susie and Justice are just two of the hundreds of large animals needing rescue in Miami. They were lucky because a concerned citizen reported their cruelty to local police. Soon, both will be available for adoption, and have second chances at life with owners who love and respect them.

The South Florida SPCA relies on donor contributions to operate two ranches in Miami-Dade, Florida where more than 80 abused, neglected and starved horses heal and live until they are adopted or taken into sanctuaries. In addition to its horses, other large livestock animals have found refuge at the SFSPCA ranches, often escaping death at illegal slaughter farms in rural areas of the county.